ET4288 Applied electromagnetic analysis in wireless, microwave and radar engineering

Topics: EM simulation methods applied to typical problems like transmission lines, microwave filters, antennas and Radar Cross Section of targets
EM simulation methods offer powerful tools for solving complex electromagnetic coupling, radiation and scattering problems, as encountered in the field of telecommunications, microwave and radar engineering. Within the course on examples of different typical problems like transmission lines, microwave filters, antennas and Radar Cross Section of targets all basics physical phenomena of EM wave interaction with objects will be analyzed and characterized. Analysis will be done in frequency as well as in time domain. Advantages and disadvantages of time-domain and frequency domain methods will be compared. The course will finish with an overview of basic recommendations regarding the choice of appropriate computational methods for different problems of wireless, microwave and radar engineering. At the supervised laboratory work commercial simulation tools are used for simulation of five practical problems of wireless, microwave and radar engineering.

The course contents consists of three major parts. In Part 1 the applied electormagnetics as a subject will be introduced, scope of the problems and typical approaches will be considered. Role of applied electromagnetics in wireless, microwave and radar engineering will be discussed. A general approach to solution of applied electromagnetics problems is presented and discussed in details.

Part 2 of the course is dedicated to frequency domain simulations. Based on a simple problem of electromagnetic waveinteraction with a thin wire all basics radiation phenomena will be analyzed and characterized. The problem will be treated via the method of moments. All essential features of the method of moments will be discussed in details. Simulation results will be verified against experimental ones. Following this, students will be introduced to the commercial program FEKO. Various structures will be modelled using FEKO, including simple 2D structures (microstrip filters and patch antennas) as well as more complex 3D scatteres (sphere). Specific issues for EM wave interaction with 2D and 3D structures will de discussed. Finally, computational limitations of frequency domain methods will be discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of time-domain and frequency domain methods will be compared.

In part 3 wideband (time domain) simulations will be discussed. On the example of one-dimensional transmission line basic time domain phenomena (such as dispersion, matching, stability) will be analyzed. Time-domain simulation will be performed using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The aim of this is to develop a basic appreciation of the FDTD method, as well as reinforce concepts of transforming between time and frequency domains. The use of time-domain simulation for ultrawideband systems will be emphasized throughout. Finally, computational aspects of FDTD such as numerical dispersion, absorbing boundary conditions and numerical complexity will be discussed. The course will finish with overview of basic recommendation regarding choice of appropriate computational method for different problems of wireless, microwave and radar engineering. The lectures are supported by supervised laboratory work at which commercial simulation tools are used for simulation of five practical problems of wireless, microwave and radar engineering.

The aim of this course is twofold: to introduce MSc students to electromagnetic problems encountered in microwave, telecommunications and radar engineering; and to teach students how to use available EM simulators for the analysis and design of microwave circuits, wireless and radar systems. Students will learn basic properties and limitations of different computational methods realized in different EM simulators.

Teachers

prof.dr. Alexander Yarovoy

microwave systems, radar

Last modified: 2014-07-26

Details

Credits: 4 EC
Period: 0/0/0/6
Contact: Alexander Yarovoy